Peter Smith

Publications, Lectures and Other Stuff

Standardized Testing

Standardized testing remains an extremely controversial topic amongst educationalists, with supporters and opponents of standardized tests such as SAT sharply divided. A recent Slate article by psychologists  and  (‘Yes, IQ Really Matters’) enters the fray on the side of the supporters charging that opponents disregard relevant studies that do not support their beliefs. Briefly:

1. There is a lot of research evidence that the traditional SAT scores are highly predictive of future academic success.

2. There is a correlation between socio-economic status and success in SAT but it is relatively weak, and many low-income students excel at SAT (which of course may make it easier for them to secure scholarships). The relation between high SAT scores and academic success is independent of socio-economic status.

3. SAT scores correlate highly with IQ test scores and IQ scores are also highly predictive of future success in life.

4. A major factor in academic success is the quality of self-control, conscientiousness and dependability (‘grit’ — i.e. Lisa rather than Bart Simpson).

The full article is here:

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/04/what_do_sat_and_iq_tests_measure_general_intelligence_predicts_school_and.html

 

 

 

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/04/what_do_sat_and_iq_tests_measure_general_intelligence_predicts_school_and.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on April 17, 2014 by in Education and tagged , , , .
%d bloggers like this: